Hazmat Training Comes to Cleveland, OH

When workers handle hazardous waste or ship hazardous materials, training is not just a good idea, it’s the law. According to the Ohio EPA, workers who handle hazardous waste must be trained annually, and the federal DOT requires that workers involved in the shipment of hazardous materials be trained at least every three years.

Environmental Resource Center, the leading provider of environmental and safety training, will present the mandatory training in Cleveland at the Holiday Inn – Select, Strongsville on January 5-7, 2010.

Hazardous Waste Management: The Complete Course will be taught on January 5 and 6.

DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course will be taught on January 7 at the same location. Classes begin at 8am and end at 5pm each day.

Untrained workers are frequently the cause of environmental accidents and penalties. In 2007, more than 20 companies had been cited by the Ohio EPA for the mismanagement of hazardous waste.

Registration for the training is available by calling 800-537-2372 or at http://www.ercweb.com/classes.

Now in its 28th year, Environmental Resource Center trains not only thousands of industry personnel every year, the company also trains personnel f r o m most of the state and federal agencies that enforce the regulations.

1 See Ohio Administrative Code 3745-52-34.
2 The list of Ohio EPA’s hazardous waste penalties is available at
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/dhwm/2007aco.html

Via EPR Network
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Reducing Diesel Soot is Faster And Cheaper Than Reducing CO2 in Effort to Slow Global Warming

In his new book, Addicted to Energy, Silicon Valley venture capitalist Elton Sherwin claims that reducing diesel soot is key to affordably protecting the planet from rapid warming.

Drawing on research from UC Berkeley, Stanford and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography , Sherwin says that reducing diesel soot is faster and cheaper than reducing CO 2 . “We still need to dramatically reduce CO 2 , but eliminating diesel soot is a quick, affordable way to lessen the likelihood of crossing a major climate threshold or tipping point.”

Some models show California ‘s Central Valley getting 10 degrees hotter this century. “We in California should be very motivated to get this right, to lead the world in developing strategies to reduce diesel soot. This is primarily a financing issue, not a technology issue. The technology exists to do this.”

Stacy Jackson in her work at UC Berkeley has shown that primary active ingredient in diesel soot, black carbon, will have a significantly greater impact on the world’s climate than CO 2 in the short term.

Veerabhadran Ramanathan, one of the world’s leading climate scientists at Scripps Institute for Oceanography in a recent article in Foreign Affairs , says that existing emissions-control technologies could “be enough to offset the warming effects of one to two decades’ worth of carbon dioxide emissions.”**

In his book Sherwin suggests including diesel soot in California ‘s cap and trade system. “ California ‘s oil companies paid to retrofit dry cleaners in southern California to offset their emissions. If diesel soot were included in a cap and trade system, California ‘s largest polluters would immediately buy soot filters for the trucking industry, because this is such an inexpensive way to reduce emissions.”

About Elton Sherwin:
Elton Sherwin is a venture capitalist and the Senior Managing Director at Ridgewood Capital, where he invests in private energy-tech and clean-tech companies. He holds eight patents and sits on the boards of several clean-tech companies. His widely acclaimed first book, The Silicon Valley Way, was translated into Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, and Korean. Published in 1998, it continues to be used by entrepreneurs and universities around the world.

About Addicted to Energy:
Addicted to Energy is written as a guidebook to a fictional governor, with advice on how to manage both the climate and energy crises. The book devotees thirty pages to California’s AB 32 legislation. The book contains many charts and graphs, as well as practical tips for homeowners, businesses, and local governments.

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Algae Collection Technology, LLC Moves a Major Step Closer to Estuary Clean-up and Alternative Energy

Algae Collection Technology, LLC (ACT) conducted a macro algae harvesting demonstration for Florida permitting officials, in the Indian River Lagoon, just east of downtown Melbourne. The successful demonstration was a major step towards securing harvesting permits that will allow the company to remove excess harmful algae f r o m estuaries, and then work with their partners to convert the algae into commercially beneficial products such as alternative energy sources.

Algae Collection Technology, LLC Moves a Major Step Closer to Estuary Clean-up and Alternative Energy

ACT’s goal with the demonstration was to show that the environmental impact appeared negligible so a permit could be issued to do a research pilot program. The research f r o m the pilot will measure the amount of harmful nutrients removed f r o m the estuary when excess algae is removed, the impact and volume of any by-catch, the improvement of water quality by avoiding anoxic conditions created by decomposing algae, the impact on sea grasses and juvenile species, and the potential improvement in water clarity/quality. It will also allow ACT’s partners to explore the yield f r o m commercial uses of the product. For example, Global Renewable Energy Resources (GRES) intends to conduct extensive research on the algae harvested in the pilot period to determine if newly invented enzymes can break down the algae into a high yield energy source.

In attendance at the demonstration were representatives f r o m the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), the St. John’s River Water Management District, The Florida Fish and Wildlife Department, and Brevard County. Viewers saw the exact harvesting equipment that will be used during the research pilot, and were briefed by Clark Giangarra, the President of ACT on how the equipment was designed, and the objectives of the harvesting. As Mr. Giangarra indicated, removing the algae has“two major ecological values. First, the algae acts like a sponge for run-off nutrients like phosphorous and nitrogen (fertilizers). When you remove algae, it takes the nutrients with it and keeps the estuary f r o m simply adding more and more nutrients to the system. Second, this algae grows into huge deposits that are often several feet thick. If they are not removed, those algae deposits die and create anoxic conditions where all surrounding sea life dies.” Mr. Giangarra went on to say that the cleanup process that removes the algae can be expensive, but interest f r o m potential partners such as GRES has convinced him that the commercial value of the product will ensure that the estuary cleanup is financed by those participating partners at no governmental expense.

The two hour demonstration featured ACT’s harvesting and wash-down system as algae was collected. The harvesting equipment is a simple hand-operated collection device that skims over the bottom. The wash-down system was designed to return by-catch to the estuary, thereby minimizing by-catch impact. As the harvesting was conducted, representatives f r o m Fish and Wildlife and DEP actually sifted through the algae noting and counting any species. In addition, divers f r o m DEP followed the harvesting equipment to observe and note any potential impact on the estuary bottom.

At the conclusion of the demonstration, an out-briefing was conducted to voice any concerns and observations, and to clarify the objectives and processes of the pilot research project. In the end, all parties had a clear understanding, and the permitting authorities agreed to allow ACT to move forward with the application for the research pilot permitting process.

“This was a huge step forward, because if we were not able to convince all parties that we apparently had minimal ecological impact, and that the pilot research project will provide extensive documentation, then they wouldn’t have even let us proceed with a permit application” said Clark Giangarra. Today, we are closer than ever to cleaning up a harmful nuisance and creating alternative renewable energy than ever before thanks to the Florida permitting officials.

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npower Helps Provide Solar Panels For Two Stockton-On-Tees Schools

npower has helped Bader Primary School and Ingleby Mill Primary School in Stockton-on-Tees to feel the warmth of the sun and lower energy bills this year thanks to its grant of £46,500 and the support of the Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council.

Bader Primary School, is home to 267 children aged between 4-11 years old and since being built in 1971 has not seen many modifications. npower has provided £10,000 of funding for a Photovoltaic (PV) system and display panel, heating control upgrade and pipe work insulation.

Ingleby Mill Primary School is a modern school with 658 pupils, npower has pledged£7,000 to the school to implement a photovoltaic (PV) system with display unit. The remaining £25,000 will fund other PV systems in local primary schools next year.

Stuart Marrow from Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council, “We have been working with npower for over a year and are seeing some really exciting projects taking off. The Solar panels at Bader and Ingleby Mill Primary Schools will go a long way to reducing Carbon Dioxide production and cutting energy costs as well as raising pupil awareness of the potential of renewable energy.”

npowers Climate Cops programme runs green-themed activities for schools right across the UK – and pupils from both Bader Primary School and Ingleby Mill Primary School have already taken part in a ‘Climate Cops Academy’ – a highly interactive day about saving energy and the planet. npower undertook an energy audit in 2008, which showed that both schools were energy efficient and would benefit from alternative methods of energy production. Both schools were prime candidates to benefit from one of npower’s Climate Cops grants.

Clare McDougall, head of the Climate Cops programme, commented, “Both schools in Stockton-on-Tees enjoyed the Climate Cops Academy day and were already very good on energy efficiency. We have worked with Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council to look at other green energy measures, the PV systems will generate a substantial amount of hot water and electricity, making both schools amongst the greenest in the area.”

npower’s Climate Cops programme has committed £500,000 in energy efficiency measures for schools, 15 projects have been completed so far and – if all the measures are implemented – the participating schools would annually save a total of around £100,000 and 650 tonnes of CO2.

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