New Website Offers News and Information on Atrazine by the Farmers Who Have Used it for Generations

Farmers launch www.AGSense.org to fight false claims and shoddy science against atrazine use. A group of farmers who raise corn, sorghum and other crops throughout the country have launched a new website, www.AGSense.org, to bring some common sense and straight talk to the debate about atrazine.

New Website Offers News and Information on Atrazine by the Farmers Who Have Used it for Generations

“Atrazine is important to keeping our food supply plentiful and affordable, and is highly effective with a remarkable track record of success—and safety—that stretches back for decades,” said Jere White, executive director of the Kansas Corn Growers Association and chairman of the Triazine Network, the group of farmers behind the new Web site.

“EPA conducted a special review of atrazine in 1994 and gave it full approval in 2006, so activists who are suddenly labeling it with false claims are irresponsible, at best, and misleading, at worst,” White said.

Farmers, ranchers and the people who consume their products can find information on AGSense.org about the various crops atrazine is used for, why exactly it is important for land conservation, its long history of scrutiny and approval by regulators all over the world, and highlights from the latest online content that tells the story of this critical tool – and the campaign against it – from across the Web.

“If AGSense.org helps just one person learn something about atrazine that he or she didn’t know before, if it helps bring just a little bit of common sense to this critical agricultural tool, it will have been worth creating,” said White. “We hope people find it useful as we fight to keep our access to atrazine alive.”

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Center for Global Food Issues Calls for Transparency for Environmental Groups Behind Atrazine Campaign

Center for Global Food Issues unveils its new blog entry, The Big Money Behind the Environmental Scare Movement –the attack on atrazine replays the alar scare, which calls for transparency into environmental activists’ work to demonize and ban the herbicide atrazine.Center for Global Food Issues Calls for Transparency for Environmental Groups Behind Atrazine Campaign

Written by Alex Avery, director of research and education for the Center for Global Food Issues at the Hudson Institute, the new blog entry questions why “activists (should) get a free ride when it comes to full disclosure,” and outlines the significant dollars behind the assault on modern agricultural technologies, particularly the safe and effective herbicide atrazine.

In his blog entry, Avery digs deeper into the public financial records of the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), one of the organizations behind the 1980’s “alar scare” and the current campaign against atrazine. Avery cites records that show that by 2004, the tax-exempt organization had received nearly $6.5 million in discretionary grants from the EPA since 1993, noting the EPA conceded all the discretionary grants awarded to the NRDC were awarded without competition. Additionally, Avery contends tax returns show NRDC received $350,000 in government money in 2007; similarly, the allied Land Stewardship Project also receives about 14 percent of its money from government grants.

Furthermore, Avery states in the entry that “according to its most recently available tax return, from 2007, the NRDC received revenues of more than $100 million and has net assets of more than $187 million. According to the Green Tracking Library, former NRDC president and founder John H. Adams had a combined 2006 income of $757,464. Just because the NRDC is officially non-profit does not mean it cannot make money from its attacks. In going after alar, the NRDC caused apple farmers to lose more than $100 million.”

Also notable, Avery highlights quote by PR strategist David Fenton in the aftermath of alar campaign: “We designed [the alar campaign] so that revenue would flow back to the National Resources Defense Council from the public, and we sold this book about pesticides through a 900 number and the (Phil) Donahue show. And to date there has been $700,000 in net revenue from it.”

Avery remarks, “I suggest that reporters, if they really want to fulfill their watchdog function, maybe ask some of these activists where their funding comes from. This is particularly important, as the activist campaign against atrazine is based largely on discrediting the ‘industry-based’ science on which regulatory approval has been at least partially based. If the default assumption is that money is the root of all evil, then transparency should be the price of being taken seriously by journalists and policymakers.”

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Hazmat Training Comes to Chattanooga

When workers handle hazardous waste or ship hazardous materials, training is not just a good idea, it’s the law. According to the EPA, workers who handle hazardous waste must be trained annually, and the federal DOT requires that workers involved in the shipment of hazardous materials be trained at least every three years.

Environmental Resource Center, the leading provider of environmental and safety training, will present the mandatory training in Chattanooga at the Chattanooga Choo Choo on June 22 – 24, 2010. Classes begin at 8am and end at 5pm each day.

Hazardous Waste Management: The Complete Course will be taught on June 22 and 23. DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course will be taught on June 24 at the same location.

Registration for the training is available by calling 800-537-2372 or at http://www.ercweb.com/classes.

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Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Training Comes to Cary, NC

Due to the unprecedented extent of the Gulf Coast oil spill, the need for industry professionals with Hazwoper training is steadily growing. OSHA requires Hazwoper training for any personnel that participate in the oil spill clean-up operations.

Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Training Comes to Cary, NC

Personnel who are expected to stop, contain, and clean up releases of all types of hazardous materials are required to have 24 hours of initial training. Personnel who are involved in clean-ups at waste sites, including Superfund sites, RCRA corrective action sites, or voluntary clean-ups involving hazardous substances must have 40 hours of initial instruction.

Environmental Resource Center, the leading provider of environmental and safety training, will present the mandatory training in Cary, NC on June 21-23 for the 24 Hr. Hazwoper and June 21-25, 2010 for the 40 Hr. Hazwoper. Classes begin at 8am and end at 5pm each day.

Personnel that complete this course, will receive a Hazwoper wallet card, a training certificate, one year of free Answerline service and handbook updates, and a free subscription to Environmental Resource Center’s safety and environmental e-newsletters.

Registration for the mandatory training is available by calling 919-469-1585, 1-800- 537-2372 or at http://www.ercweb.com/classes

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