U.S. Soybean Farmers Help Support World Food Supply

United Soybean Board Highlights Soy Biotechnology as Way to Address Global Food Demand.

As the global population continues to increase, the United Soybean Board highlights soy biotechnology on its new Web pages. The information demonstrates how biotechnology utilized by U.S. soybean farmers remains as a safe and efficient way to improve crop yields and productivity in the United States and across the globe, and contribute positively to the world food supply.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, global food demand is increasing, with nearly 1 billion people all around the world waking up hungry and going to bed the same way. The U.N. predicts that, 50 years from now, our growing population could require us to produce twice as much food as we do today to provide for even basic food needs.

Many U.S. farmers, however, use biotechnology advances to address growing human population and world hunger by producing food that is both healthy and more abundant. By emphasizing sustainable production, farmers continue to meet the urgent needs of today and the growing demands of tomorrow.

For additional information about how agriculture benefits the world, and soybeans’ role in the global food supply, visit the United Soybean Board’s expanded consumer Web pages here. Additional conversation about soybeans and sustainability can be found on the blog www.usbthinkingahead.com.

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Caribou Extinction Is The Latest Environmental Threat To Oil Industry

The possible extinction of the woodland caribou in Alberta, Canada is the latest environmental disaster threatening to disrupt the oil industry, according to a new report issued today (15/7/10) by The Co-operative.

Woodland caribou, once common in the boreal forest of Alberta, are now threatened with extinction in the region by rapidly expanding developments extracting oil from the tar sands. Under Canadian law the government has a duty to protect the habitat of woodland caribou; however, to date, next to no action has been taken. In response Cree indigenous communities living in the area are now calling for an immediate moratorium with immediate effect, on all new industrial developments in those areas within caribou habitat.

This would have major consequences for oil industry expansion plans for the tar sands, including BP’s recently announced Kirby tar sands project which would lie within critical habitat.

As part of its Toxic Fuels Campaign as well as other environmental campaigns such as Climate Change Facts, The Co-operative is working with the Beaver Lake Cree Nation, a small indigenous community in northeast Alberta whose traditional territories cover 30 per cent of all existing Albertan tar sands operations.

An expert study by Dr Stan Boutin of the University of Alberta and funded by The Co-operative, looked at the two caribou herds within the Beaver Lake Cree’s traditional territories, an area the size of Switzerland. It found that only 175 – 275 caribou remain, down 10 fold on historic numbers, and that these herds are facing extinction by 2025 without immediate habitat protection.

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Corporate Social Responsibility TV Channel In Hong Kong Needs Your Video

Corporate Social Responsibility TV Channel is an ipTV newly setup in Hong Kong for promoting CSR, green policies and charity organizations activities. TV is seen on TV box in Hong Kong, www.carehk.tv has some basic info.

Corporate Social Responsibility TV Channel In Hong Kong Needs Your Video

www.carehk.tv is the Web TV and also seen on iPhones and Smartphone with flash player capability.

We need your help to provide some good CSR video, Green video and Charity organizations videos. This is free for charity organizations but some charge for corporations.

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Hazmat Training Comes to Philadelphia

When workers handle hazardous waste or ship hazardous materials, training is not just a good idea, it’s the law. According to the EPA, workers who handle hazardous waste must be trained annually, and the federal DOT requires that workers involved in the shipment of hazardous materials be trained at least every three years.

DOT and RCRA Annual Update and Refresher course is the perfect way to meet both your annual review and DOT 49 CFR recurrent training requirements as well as learn about new requirements that have been enacted over the past year. For those individuals with prior RCRA training, Advanced Hazardous Waste Management will be taught. This class covers much more than the regulatory requirements and meets your annual training requirement.

Environmental Resource Center, the leading provider of environmental and safety training, will present the mandatory training in Philadelphia at the Embassy Suites – Philadelphia Airport on August 3 and 4, 2010. Classes begin at 8am and end at 5pm each day.

The Update and Refresher course will be taught on August 3.

Advanced Hazardous Waste Management will be taught on August 4
.

Registration for the mandatory training is available by calling 800-537-2372 or at http://www.ercweb.com/classes.

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Hazmat Training Comes to Cleveland, OH

When workers handle hazardous waste or ship hazardous materials, training is not just a good idea, it’s the law. According to the Ohio EPA, workers who handle hazardous waste must be trained annually, and the federal DOT requires that workers involved in the shipment of hazardous materials be trained at least every three years.

Environmental Resource Center, the leading provider of environmental and safety training, will present the mandatory training in Cleveland at the Holiday Inn Select – Strongsville on August 3-5, 2010.

Hazardous Waste Management: The Complete Course will be taught on August 3 and 4.

DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course will be taught on August 5 at the same location. Classes begin at 8am and end at 5pm each day.

Untrained workers are frequently the cause of environmental accidents and penalties. In 2007, more than 20 companies had been cited by the Ohio EPA for the mismanagement of hazardous waste.

Registration for the training is available by calling 800-537-2372 or at http://www.ercweb.com/classes.

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The Shocking Truth About Traditional Flea Treatments

Products intended to treat cats and dogs for fleas and ticks kill hundreds of pets each year and injure tens of thousands, said the Environmental Protection Agency in a March 2010 statement. In a now famous ABC News report released in 2008, traditional spot drop flea and tick medicines were found to cause more than 44,000 severe reactions, including seizures and 1,200 deaths.

There is no such thing as chemical flea “prevention” on an animal. Fleas are killed when they bite pets for a blood meal. They die from the toxins systemically wicked into and carried in the animal’s bloodstream.

Due to widespread controversy over traditional flea and tick control methods, cedar oil insecticides have gained increasing popularity and respect in the veterinary and organic farming communities. In 2006, at the request of the U.S. Army, a team of world renowned organic scientists expanded upon traditional cedar oil formulations by introducing a quartz rock carrier to deliver a lethal dose of substance at the microscopic level. This nano-sized delivery system closes the breathing pores of pheromone driven insects on contact and creates a lasting barrier that discourages new insects from latching onto treated animals.

At the forefront of the cedar oil movement is a company based in the heart of Texas and marketed at Bugshateit.com. Their product is endorsed by Animal Wellness Magazine and recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as the number one biological insect control formula, proven superior to chemical counterparts. The formula is strong enough to battle crop pests on commercial farms yet safe enough to treat neighborhood yards for mosquitoes and venomous snakes. Last year alone, one of the most prominent pest control companies in the United States ordered 5,000 gallons of the product.

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Soybean Farmers’ Focus on Sustainable Agricultural Methods Featured on New Web Pages

Practices That Save Soil, Ensure Clean Water and Conserve Energy Represent Modern Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security.

Without fertile land, clean water and ample natural resources, farmers and ranchers cannot do their jobs of producing sustainable foods to feed our growing world. As the United Soybean Board points out on the group’s new Web pages, today’s agriculturalists embrace these modern production methods and technologies like never before to help contribute to sustainable agriculture and food security for our growing planet.

Conservation tillage serves as an integral part of critical sustainable agricultural methods important to our food security, as it serves as a way of growing crops from year to year without disturbing topsoil. By minimizing tillage, farmers can decrease erosion and increase the amount of water and carbon that stays trapped in the soil and available to their crops. This means less carbon in the air and a reduced need to tap into water supplies. It also helps stop soil and other runoff and conserves energy by requiring fewer trips across fields.

Online tracking programs, such as virtual calculators, offer another key tool for ensuring sustainability in the food industry. These tools optimize farmers’ efficiency by allowing them to see almost immediately how their choices impact natural resources, production levels and ultimately the sustainability performance of their farms.

For additional information about soy biotechnology’s role in sustainable foods, visit the United Soybean Board’s consumer Web pages here. Additional conversation about soybeans and sustainability can be found on the blog www.usbthinkingahead.com.

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National Trust Reports Puffin Sat-Nav Helping To Solve Mystery Of Feeding Flight Paths

Cutting edge technology is shedding light on the daily flight paths of puffins around the National Trust’s Farne Islands, off the Northumberland coast, and providing clues that could be vital to the seabirds’ survival.

Over the last year, scientists have used the technology to build up a picture of where the puffins are heading for when they take off from the Farne Islands each day. This shows that they are making a beeline for feeding ‘hotspots’ 20 miles out to sea.

Along with their established and protected breeding grounds on the islands, these hotspots may be important areas to conserve in order to ensure the puffin’s future survival.

Since last year, after a dramatic 30 per cent decline in puffin numbers had been recorded in 2008*, a team of researchers from Newcastle University have been working with National Trust wardens on Brownsman Island and deploying a whole raft of puffin technology to track their every move.

David Steel, National Trust Head Warden on the Farne Islands, said: “This new research and our ongoing puffin count are finally piecing together a complete picture of puffin behaviour.

“The puffins seem to be recovering slowly from the 2008 crash, with a five per cent increase in numbers recorded both this year and last.

“Technology is helping us to understand what steps need to be taken to secure their future, and that of all the seabirds that find a safe haven on the Farne Islands each year.”

Dr Richard Bevan from Newcastle University, who is leading the research, said: “The technology has come into its own here on the Farne Islands. Knowing where these seabirds go to feed is a vital factor in their survival.

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Loss of Atrazine Would Wipe Out 21,000 to 48,000 Jobs Dependant on Agriculture

Banning the agricultural herbicide atrazine would cost between 21,000 and 48,000 jobs from corn production losses alone, according to University of Chicago economist Don L. Coursey, Ph.D.

Dr. Coursey announced his findings at a briefing sponsored by the Triazine Network today at the National Press Club in Washington.

Coursey estimates atrazine’s annual production value to corn alone to be between $2.3 billion and $5 billion. Atrazine’s additional value to sorghum, sugar cane and other uses increases these totals.

“The economic data on atrazine are very clear. As a first-order estimate, banning atrazine will erase between 21,000 and 48,000 jobs related to or dependant on corn production, with additional job losses coming from both sugar cane and sorghum production losses,” Coursey said. “The range is wide because we have never before banned a product on which so many depend and for which suitable replacements have a wide variety of prices and application regimes.”

“If all of that job loss were concentrated in the agricultural sector, its unemployment would grow by as much as 2.6 percent. Replacement costs for corn farmers could reach as high as $58 per acre,” Coursey said.

Atrazine has been a mainstay of corn, sorghum and sugar cane production for 50 years. The second most-used herbicide in the U.S., it controls a broad range of yield-robbing weeds, is safe for the crop and supports a variety of farming systems, including soil-saving conservation-till agriculture.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) re-registered atrazine in 2006 based on the evidence of nearly 6,000 studies and more than 80,000 public comments. It began an additional, unscheduled review of atrazine in late 2009.

“Atrazine is essential to U.S. agriculture. We appreciate Dr. Coursey’s findings and will distribute them to our members, the EPA and to our elected representatives. With unemployment still painfully high across the nation, we can’t afford to lose as many as 50,000 jobs and the corn yield that sustains them,” said Jere White, Triazine Network chairman and executive director of the Kansas Corn Growers Association.

EPA cited a media report and claims by a longtime anti-atrazine group when it announced the additional, unscheduled review. It was the first time in history EPA did not cite sound science to initiate a review process.

Coursey’s statement can be viewed at http://agsense.org/.

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